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In an oil painting emulating the style of artists from the late 19th and early 20th century, such as the impressionists, “The Red Baron” Manfred Von Richthofen is depicted in aerial combat over France in 1917. Having set out to paint the Red Baron over the Western Front, I studied the style of contemporary artists of the time. Some of the masters of Impressionism and Post-Impressionism were still living and that style of painting was still very much in fashion. With that style in mind I created a simple to illustrate a moment in time from the last century. In the painting Rittmeister Manfred Freiherr von Richthofen, better known as “The Red Baron”, banks his Albatros D.V. as his opponent of RFC No. 20 Squadron turns his F.E.2d into him on July 6, 1917.

Late in the morning of July 6, 1917, Rittmeister Frhr. Von Richthofen (The Red Baron) led nine of his men on a patrol to intercept a number of British aircraft that were operating behind German lines. After identifying the aircraft as FE2ds, von Richthofen positioned his staffel to obtain a tactical advantage and commence an attack on the interloping Englishmen. Upon sighting the Germans, the FE2ds of No. 20 Squadron, Royal Flying Corps, turned into the potential threat. One aircraft, piloted by Capt. D.C. Cunnell with observer 2nd Lt. A.E. Woodbridge, began to fire while still at extreme range.

Von Richthofen’s own account describes the action: “After some time we approached so close to the last plane that I began to consider a means of attacking him. (Lt. Kurt) Wolff was flying below me. The hammering of a German machine gun indicated to me that he was fighting. Then my opponent turned and accepted the fight but at such a distance that one could hardly call it a real air fight. I had not even prepared my gun for fighting, for there was lots of time before I could begin to fight. Then I saw that the enemy’s observer (Woodbridge), probably from sheer excitement, opened fire. I let him shoot, for a distance of 300 yards and more the best marksmanship is helpless. One does not hit the target at such a distance. Now he flies toward me and I hope that I will succeed in getting behind him and opening fire. Suddenly something strikes me in the head…”

Von Richthofen had been shot behind the left ear. Momentarily blinded and paralyzed, he managed to regain control of his senses and aircraft to make an emergency landing on a Flanders field behind German lines. In 1968 several photos taken by one of the German soldiers at the scene of his emergency landing surfaced. Those photos provided for historians conclusive evidence as to what “The Red Baron’s” Albatros looked like the first time he was shot down.

Oil on Canvas 40″ x 30″.

Shipped rolled in tube, requires stretching or framing by purchaser.

Von Richthofen

Troy White

AUD$8,500
Size: 101.6w x 76.2h cms
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Oil on canvas

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Additional Information

In an oil painting emulating the style of artists from the late 19th and early 20th century, such as the impressionists, “The Red Baron” Manfred Von Richthofen is depicted in aerial combat over France in 1917. Having set out to paint the Red Baron over the Western Front, I studied the style of contemporary artists of the time. Some of the masters of Impressionism and Post-Impressionism were still living and that style of painting was still very much in fashion. With that style in mind I created a simple to illustrate a moment in time from the last century. In the painting Rittmeister Manfred Freiherr von Richthofen, better known as “The Red Baron”, banks his Albatros D.V. as his opponent of RFC No. 20 Squadron turns his F.E.2d into him on July 6, 1917.

Late in the morning of July 6, 1917, Rittmeister Frhr. Von Richthofen (The Red Baron) led nine of his men on a patrol to intercept a number of British aircraft that were operating behind German lines. After identifying the aircraft as FE2ds, von Richthofen positioned his staffel to obtain a tactical advantage and commence an attack on the interloping Englishmen. Upon sighting the Germans, the FE2ds of No. 20 Squadron, Royal Flying Corps, turned into the potential threat. One aircraft, piloted by Capt. D.C. Cunnell with observer 2nd Lt. A.E. Woodbridge, began to fire while still at extreme range.

Von Richthofen’s own account describes the action: “After some time we approached so close to the last plane that I began to consider a means of attacking him. (Lt. Kurt) Wolff was flying below me. The hammering of a German machine gun indicated to me that he was fighting. Then my opponent turned and accepted the fight but at such a distance that one could hardly call it a real air fight. I had not even prepared my gun for fighting, for there was lots of time before I could begin to fight. Then I saw that the enemy’s observer (Woodbridge), probably from sheer excitement, opened fire. I let him shoot, for a distance of 300 yards and more the best marksmanship is helpless. One does not hit the target at such a distance. Now he flies toward me and I hope that I will succeed in getting behind him and opening fire. Suddenly something strikes me in the head…”

Von Richthofen had been shot behind the left ear. Momentarily blinded and paralyzed, he managed to regain control of his senses and aircraft to make an emergency landing on a Flanders field behind German lines. In 1968 several photos taken by one of the German soldiers at the scene of his emergency landing surfaced. Those photos provided for historians conclusive evidence as to what “The Red Baron’s” Albatros looked like the first time he was shot down.

Oil on Canvas 40″ x 30″.

Shipped rolled in tube, requires stretching or framing by purchaser.