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Views of meteors across Aboriginal cultures are many and diverse, but most relate to death and evil spirits. A frequent interpretation is that meteors were the spirits of the recently deceased. In Wardaman traditions (near Katherine, NT), when a person dies their spirit ascends into the sky and passes through the star Garrndarin, becoming a star of its own. It looked after by the Rock-Cod star Munin before falling back to Earth as a meteor. The star-spirit fell into a stream, where the Earthly Rock-Cod looked after it again. The spirit then pursued a potential mother and entered her to be reincarnated as a baby.

Jenny is a Kamilaroi woman and is a member of the Worimi Aboriginal Land Council. She is mother of seven children and works with disaffected Indigenous youth. Her experiences are reflected in her art as she relates stories in her own unique way.

 

Print measures 370 mm X 290 mm (37 cm x 29 cm) approx

Views of meteors across Aboriginal cultures are many and diverse, but most relate to death and evil spirits. A frequent interpretation is that meteors were the spirits of the recently deceased. In Wardaman traditions (near Katherine, NT), when a person dies their spirit ascends into the sky and passes through the star Garrndarin, becoming a star of its own. It looked after by the Rock-Cod star Munin before falling back to Earth as a meteor. The star-spirit fell into a stream, where the Earthly Rock-Cod looked after it again. The spirit then pursued a potential mother and entered her to be reincarnated as a baby.

Across northern Australia, meteors are seen as the fiery eyes of celestial serpents (sometimes called the Rainbow Serpent). The Tiwi people of Bathurst and Melville islands north of Darwin, NT see meteors as the Papinjuwari – evil spirits with long claws that steal the hearts of babies. In the Yolngu traditions of Arnhem Land (NT), a similar spirit is called Namorrorddo, and in Lardil traditions of Mornington Island (QLD) it is called Thuwathu. Meteor traditions also involved war. Aboriginal groups in northern QLD. followed the trails of meteors, believing the falling stars would lead them to enemy warriors. The Ngarigo people of New South Wales believed a meteor pointed to the direction of a group preparing for war. The Wathi-Wathi people of the Murray River region in Victoria perceived meteors as the path of a nulla-nulla (a short spear) in the sky. Similarly, Arrernte revenge rituals in the Central Desert (NT) involved throwing a small spear filled with evil magic in the direction of the intended target. If a meteor appeared, it signified the death of the person.

We respectfully advise members of Aboriginal communities that this site may contain photographs or mention in writing of people who have passed away.

Each framed print is printed on quality 300 GSM silk matte paper, is one of only 30 available, is individually numbered and signed by artist with certificate of authenticity. Genuine Aboriginal Art from the Hunter Valley region in NSW, Australia. Perfect house warming gift.

All works are subject to copyright ©2018 Koori Kolour

Spirit in the Sky Ltd Ed

Jen Bailey

AUD$98
Size: 37w x 29h x 5d cms

Limited Edition 0nly 30 produced on 300gsm premium silk matte paper
Framed under glass
Ready to hang

In stock

Sold By: Jen Bailey

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