• Lunch On Grass
  • Lunch In Situ
  • Ohmyprints 05052019 065221

Additional Information

“Lunch on the Grass – Kakadu Billabong” is my take on the French artist Manet’s 1863 painting, “Le De Jeuner L’herbe” but in

an outback setting.

I have always been intrigued by the story behind this figurative landscape painting.  I admire the risk taker and rule breaker Manet was – his struggles against the Paris Salon for him to conform to classic style verses his modernist/impressionist leaning, his disregard for conventional subjects, correct perspectives etc.  I also love the ambiguity of this work and the more questions it raises when the more one looks.  All is not what it seems when you understand the back story.

My approach to this painting was to accomplish the strong triangular positioning of the central figures and to create a noticeable play of dappled light by applying transparent oil glaze brush strokes over contrasting dark shadows and always mindful to keep the brushstrokes lively and playful.

There is a predominance of pink hues in the light areas to reflect the same tones found in the Australian outback and the Kakadu National Park. Abstract figurative landscape.

 

Lunch on the Grass – Kakadu Billabong

Kathryn Fenton

AUD$950
Size: 90w x 120h x 4d cms
View in my room

or 4 fortnightly payments of AUD$237.50 with Afterpay More info

Mixed media – acrylic oil and charcoal on deep canvas

Ready to hang

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Additional Information

“Lunch on the Grass – Kakadu Billabong” is my take on the French artist Manet’s 1863 painting, “Le De Jeuner L’herbe” but in

an outback setting.

I have always been intrigued by the story behind this figurative landscape painting.  I admire the risk taker and rule breaker Manet was – his struggles against the Paris Salon for him to conform to classic style verses his modernist/impressionist leaning, his disregard for conventional subjects, correct perspectives etc.  I also love the ambiguity of this work and the more questions it raises when the more one looks.  All is not what it seems when you understand the back story.

My approach to this painting was to accomplish the strong triangular positioning of the central figures and to create a noticeable play of dappled light by applying transparent oil glaze brush strokes over contrasting dark shadows and always mindful to keep the brushstrokes lively and playful.

There is a predominance of pink hues in the light areas to reflect the same tones found in the Australian outback and the Kakadu National Park. Abstract figurative landscape.