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  • Dérive No1
  • Dérive No1 Room1

Additional Information

‘Dérive No. 1’ is a multi-layered, textural abstract original artwork.

  • Ready to Hang Original Abstract
  • W 122cm x H 91cm x D 4cm (deep edge canvas)
  • Acrylic on canvas
  • Painted edges and sealed with a gloss varnish
  • Signed on front
  • Certificate of Authenticity

Dérive (Drift)

The dérive is a revolutionary strategy originally put forward in the “Theory of the Dérive” (1956) by Guy Debord, a member at the time of the Letterist International. Debord defined the dérive as “a mode of experimental behaviour linked to the conditions of urban society: a technique of rapid passage through varied ambiances.”
It is an unplanned journey through a landscape, usually urban, in which participants drop their everyday relations and “let themselves be drawn by the attractions of the terrain and the encounters they find there.”

Dérive No. 1

Melanie Crawford

AUD$1,150
Size: 122w x 91h x 4d cms
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Acrylic on canvas

Ready to hang

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Additional Information

‘Dérive No. 1’ is a multi-layered, textural abstract original artwork.

  • Ready to Hang Original Abstract
  • W 122cm x H 91cm x D 4cm (deep edge canvas)
  • Acrylic on canvas
  • Painted edges and sealed with a gloss varnish
  • Signed on front
  • Certificate of Authenticity

Dérive (Drift)

The dérive is a revolutionary strategy originally put forward in the “Theory of the Dérive” (1956) by Guy Debord, a member at the time of the Letterist International. Debord defined the dérive as “a mode of experimental behaviour linked to the conditions of urban society: a technique of rapid passage through varied ambiances.”
It is an unplanned journey through a landscape, usually urban, in which participants drop their everyday relations and “let themselves be drawn by the attractions of the terrain and the encounters they find there.”