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  • Proud Colourcorrection 2019
  • Proud Colourcorrection 2019

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Proud (Colour Correction) by Kate Constantine

Original work on canvas; acrylic paint
1010 X 1500 X 50mm

Stretched and Framed and ready to hang!

July 2019

When you fix a mistake, you make a correction, a change that rights a wrong. When you correct a misspelled word, you’ve made a correction. Well done! Correction also applies to punishment, which is another way to right a wrong. A correction is an improvement or a revision when there’s something that needs to be fixed.

Konstantina known for powerful use of colour has put together a series of work that annotates today’s political and socio-political environment from her perspective as an Aboriginal woman, mother and activist.

Each work plays on a double entendre based on typically European interpretations of words, though uses colour to counter that European meaning and provide an Aboriginal context.

This work is extremely personal and emotive. It is meaningful on a number of levels, whilst boasting a playfulness that takes the sting out of the messages Konstantina delivers the viewer.

DIDACTIC:

Some argue that our culture would have oppressed such (homosexual or LGBTI) behaviour. This raises some interesting questions, as well as some colonial mythologies. Which traditional Aboriginal culture is being referred to here? When white people colonised Australia, there were hundreds of Aboriginal cultures. To know the mores and values of every single Aboriginal culture would be a major feat of anthropological prowess.

The idea of ‘traditions’ is also dangerous because it glues us to the past, rendering us immovable and static. It also sets up a system of haves and have-nots – those who have maintained their ‘traditional’ culture, and those who have lost it. All cultures change, and Aboriginal people would not have survived for so long had they not been adaptive and dynamic.*Excerpt from Archer magazine originally published in June 2014. Steven Lindsay Ross is a proud Wamba Wamba man from Deniliquin, New South Wales. Steven has worked in water management, Indigenous rights, crime prevention and the arts, and has attended two United Nations meetings on Indigenous issues and is proudly gay.

Proud (Colour Correction)

Kate Constantine

AUD$7,000
Size: 155w x 110h cms
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Acrylic on canvas

Requires stretching to hang

In stock

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SKU: CC_Proud
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Additional Information

Proud (Colour Correction) by Kate Constantine

Original work on canvas; acrylic paint
1010 X 1500 X 50mm

Stretched and Framed and ready to hang!

July 2019

When you fix a mistake, you make a correction, a change that rights a wrong. When you correct a misspelled word, you’ve made a correction. Well done! Correction also applies to punishment, which is another way to right a wrong. A correction is an improvement or a revision when there’s something that needs to be fixed.

Konstantina known for powerful use of colour has put together a series of work that annotates today’s political and socio-political environment from her perspective as an Aboriginal woman, mother and activist.

Each work plays on a double entendre based on typically European interpretations of words, though uses colour to counter that European meaning and provide an Aboriginal context.

This work is extremely personal and emotive. It is meaningful on a number of levels, whilst boasting a playfulness that takes the sting out of the messages Konstantina delivers the viewer.

DIDACTIC:

Some argue that our culture would have oppressed such (homosexual or LGBTI) behaviour. This raises some interesting questions, as well as some colonial mythologies. Which traditional Aboriginal culture is being referred to here? When white people colonised Australia, there were hundreds of Aboriginal cultures. To know the mores and values of every single Aboriginal culture would be a major feat of anthropological prowess.

The idea of ‘traditions’ is also dangerous because it glues us to the past, rendering us immovable and static. It also sets up a system of haves and have-nots – those who have maintained their ‘traditional’ culture, and those who have lost it. All cultures change, and Aboriginal people would not have survived for so long had they not been adaptive and dynamic.*Excerpt from Archer magazine originally published in June 2014. Steven Lindsay Ross is a proud Wamba Wamba man from Deniliquin, New South Wales. Steven has worked in water management, Indigenous rights, crime prevention and the arts, and has attended two United Nations meetings on Indigenous issues and is proudly gay.

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