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Additional Information

Barrier Reef Dreaming by Jen Bailey

Jenny is a Kamilaroi woman and is a member of the Worimi Aboriginal Land Council. She is mother of seven children and works with disaffected Indigenous youth. Her experiences are reflected in her art as she relates stories in her own unique way.

Her art works are sought after and collected all over the world. Her work “Rainbow Serpent” adorns a Norwegian collector’s private plane.

Jen’s original art is not only an investment but a stunning addition to any home décor

We respectfully advise members of Aboriginal communities that this site may contain photographs or mention in writing of people who have passed away.

Will arrive securely packaged.

Includes certificate of authenticity signed by artist JEN BAILEY

Traditional Kamilaroi Nation art

 

STORY OF THE BARRIER REEF

Some of the Traditional Owners along the Great Barrier Reef coast have Dreaming stories from when their ancestors lived on the coastal plains near the edge of the continental shelf. Their myths and legends are expressed through dance and song and there are many creation stories for the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park’s islands and reefs.

The deep cultural connection they have to the sea is taught to each new generation. Hunting, fishing, collecting, and looking after culturally significant sites have always been an important part of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures.

These activities are deeply rooted in their traditions and customs. Continuing these traditions is of high cultural importance, and key to preserving the connection between the past, present and future. It establishes a strong sense of self identity, and most importantly, a connection to place. Sea country is also important to the subsistence lifestyles of Indigenous peoples.

 

 Investing in Aboriginal Art

Australian Aboriginal art has seen an unprecedented increase in popularity over recent years and this is not restricted to its native country.

Internationally recognised as a unique form of art, it is welcomed overseas and respected and admired by art critics everywhere.

Of late, it has also come to the attention of not only art investors but also to the wider audience, as astute buyers realize its potential in the marketplace.

Hailed as arguably the last great art movement, works produced emanate from a 40,000 year Culture and Tradition.

Whilst steeped in what was originally viewed as ethnographic histories, the works produced are very often amazingly modern in design and colour and therefore aesthetically pleasing

In Australia, Aboriginal art is the most fashionable genre of art and is far more in demand than any other kind represented in the art place.

Many important Australian Art Galleries have devoted and converted over 60 percent of their retail premises to showcasing Aboriginal art. As sales via the major Auction Houses in Australian capital cities will confirm, Aboriginal art is a best seller.

Worldwide interest is rapidly rising, as the Musee du quai Branley in Paris, instigated by French President Jacques Chirac will attest. Now may be the best time to invest, as prices are dramatically rising, and wise investment will surely guarantee excellent returns.

A work by renowned artist Clifford Possum Tjapaltjarri titled “Warlugalong” fetched an impressive AU$2,400,000.00 in Sotheby’s auction Melbourne 2007, setting a benchmark for return on original outlay to the vendor.

The art is country based – that is to say, the artists proudly depict only the images and stories of their particular region. The desert artists in the main use acrylic medium, in a myriad of colours and techniques.

These are unique and individual artworks created by members of the oldest indigenous culture in the world. It is exciting to be part of their culture and share their stories of survival and be comforted by the fact that what you are buying is not only an investment, but a piece of history.

As well as style of works, one should also consider further diversification to include emerging artists with a proven track record and high popular demand, as their works will be less expensive than the established artists and the probability of high dividends for lesser outlay is a sensible decision.

When investing in Aboriginal art, provenance is of the highest importance.

This will ultimately decide the value of the work. Written documented provenance is paramount. This is normally via a Certificate of Authenticity provided by the seller, guaranteeing that the work is by the stated artist.

Further details such as the title of the painting, information on the story of the painting, a biography of the artist including their Collections and Exhibitions and other achievements normally accompany a purchase from a reputable Seller.

Images of the artist executing the artwork and holding the completed work do not prove authenticity, however they are of immense interest and again, the best suppliers of artworks offer these where it is possible.

Bear in mind, the Aboriginal artworks that have achieved highest prices through major auctions have not originated at art centers and provenance from a reputable gallery or dealer is also highly regarded.

And remember, always buy what you like so when it is hanging on your wall, the current state of the resale market is the last thing on your mind.

Barrier Reef Dreaming

Jen Bailey

AUD$499
Size: 20w x 40h x 5d cms
View in my room

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Aboriginal Acrylic Dot painting on floating pine

Framed and ready to hang

In stock

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Additional Information

Barrier Reef Dreaming by Jen Bailey

Jenny is a Kamilaroi woman and is a member of the Worimi Aboriginal Land Council. She is mother of seven children and works with disaffected Indigenous youth. Her experiences are reflected in her art as she relates stories in her own unique way.

Her art works are sought after and collected all over the world. Her work “Rainbow Serpent” adorns a Norwegian collector’s private plane.

Jen’s original art is not only an investment but a stunning addition to any home décor

We respectfully advise members of Aboriginal communities that this site may contain photographs or mention in writing of people who have passed away.

Will arrive securely packaged.

Includes certificate of authenticity signed by artist JEN BAILEY

Traditional Kamilaroi Nation art

 

STORY OF THE BARRIER REEF

Some of the Traditional Owners along the Great Barrier Reef coast have Dreaming stories from when their ancestors lived on the coastal plains near the edge of the continental shelf. Their myths and legends are expressed through dance and song and there are many creation stories for the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park’s islands and reefs.

The deep cultural connection they have to the sea is taught to each new generation. Hunting, fishing, collecting, and looking after culturally significant sites have always been an important part of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures.

These activities are deeply rooted in their traditions and customs. Continuing these traditions is of high cultural importance, and key to preserving the connection between the past, present and future. It establishes a strong sense of self identity, and most importantly, a connection to place. Sea country is also important to the subsistence lifestyles of Indigenous peoples.

 

 Investing in Aboriginal Art

Australian Aboriginal art has seen an unprecedented increase in popularity over recent years and this is not restricted to its native country.

Internationally recognised as a unique form of art, it is welcomed overseas and respected and admired by art critics everywhere.

Of late, it has also come to the attention of not only art investors but also to the wider audience, as astute buyers realize its potential in the marketplace.

Hailed as arguably the last great art movement, works produced emanate from a 40,000 year Culture and Tradition.

Whilst steeped in what was originally viewed as ethnographic histories, the works produced are very often amazingly modern in design and colour and therefore aesthetically pleasing

In Australia, Aboriginal art is the most fashionable genre of art and is far more in demand than any other kind represented in the art place.

Many important Australian Art Galleries have devoted and converted over 60 percent of their retail premises to showcasing Aboriginal art. As sales via the major Auction Houses in Australian capital cities will confirm, Aboriginal art is a best seller.

Worldwide interest is rapidly rising, as the Musee du quai Branley in Paris, instigated by French President Jacques Chirac will attest. Now may be the best time to invest, as prices are dramatically rising, and wise investment will surely guarantee excellent returns.

A work by renowned artist Clifford Possum Tjapaltjarri titled “Warlugalong” fetched an impressive AU$2,400,000.00 in Sotheby’s auction Melbourne 2007, setting a benchmark for return on original outlay to the vendor.

The art is country based – that is to say, the artists proudly depict only the images and stories of their particular region. The desert artists in the main use acrylic medium, in a myriad of colours and techniques.

These are unique and individual artworks created by members of the oldest indigenous culture in the world. It is exciting to be part of their culture and share their stories of survival and be comforted by the fact that what you are buying is not only an investment, but a piece of history.

As well as style of works, one should also consider further diversification to include emerging artists with a proven track record and high popular demand, as their works will be less expensive than the established artists and the probability of high dividends for lesser outlay is a sensible decision.

When investing in Aboriginal art, provenance is of the highest importance.

This will ultimately decide the value of the work. Written documented provenance is paramount. This is normally via a Certificate of Authenticity provided by the seller, guaranteeing that the work is by the stated artist.

Further details such as the title of the painting, information on the story of the painting, a biography of the artist including their Collections and Exhibitions and other achievements normally accompany a purchase from a reputable Seller.

Images of the artist executing the artwork and holding the completed work do not prove authenticity, however they are of immense interest and again, the best suppliers of artworks offer these where it is possible.

Bear in mind, the Aboriginal artworks that have achieved highest prices through major auctions have not originated at art centers and provenance from a reputable gallery or dealer is also highly regarded.

And remember, always buy what you like so when it is hanging on your wall, the current state of the resale market is the last thing on your mind.

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