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And if one paramedic, should accidentally fall, there’ll be… by Jayne Curle (The Self Conscious Extrovert)

The guy second from the right isn’t questioning why he took this particular career path: he knows it was to help people. 

He’s not ruminating on how his patients transformed their adoration into unadulterated fear: over two years ago he became the germ and not the antidote.

He’s not reflecting on the relentless abuse he suffered whilst trying to get his PPE on fast enough or the lives that may have been lost because of those extra seconds taken. Not to mention how it affected his ability to do his job effectively at times.

He cannot comprehend the selfishness of certain individuals who continued to use his service literally, as an Uber, even through a pandemic. 

He refuses to consider the impact of not refuelling his body or even having a sip of water during a 12 hour shift. There was no time to demask easily. He ponders, “Did we make good decisions in this state?”

He won’t dwell upon the risk and the stress he put himself, his wife and his kids through, day after day.

He can’t fathom how his colleague was fired because she wouldn’t get the jab or that she was threatened with six months in jail if she turned up for a shift. He also can’t bear to witness the  desiccating shell of the woman she now is: packing boxes part time in a factory because her paramedic skill set is all she’s ever known.

He doesn’t deliberate over the government’s false claims that everything was ok: that they were coping. They were not coping. He is not coping. He is watching his colleagues leave in droves and all that’s left of this massively understaffed, overworked health sector is a cohort of beyond burnt out human beings. They are NOT superheroes. PTSD, depersonalisation and lack of empathy are creeping in. They’ve all been running on empty way too long.

He’s not thinking about the current, sole topic of conversation amongst his colleagues when they’re ramping. It used to be; the last job, how’s the fam, what you up to this week? Now it’s, “How can we leave? What can we possibly do instead?” 

He is, however, extrapolating into the future, contemplating the aftermath. Graduating paramedics are now entering the field. The quality of their on site training will be so below par it’s terrifying. This is not stacking shelves or waiting on tables. He and his colleagues don’t have the time or the energy to do their own job properly let alone teach others in real-time situations. These graduates will not get the training they deserve. They will not be able to do their job well. And these graduates will become the teachers for the next generation and so on and so forth. 

He is thinking, “If it were me, I would not want to put my life in their hands down the track.”

He is thinking he might also leave.

*Photo Credit: Tim Freer

Original
Framed in 1cm Black Stained Tasmanian Oak
Signed on the front
Signed Certificate of Authenticity.
Total dimensions inc. Frame – 79.2cm x 125.5cm x 5.5cm

And if one paramedic, should accidentally fall, there’ll be…

Jayne Curle

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And if one paramedic, should accidentally fall, there’ll be… by Jayne Curle (The Self Conscious Extrovert)

The guy second from the right isn’t questioning why he took this particular career path: he knows it was to help people. 

He’s not ruminating on how his patients transformed their adoration into unadulterated fear: over two years ago he became the germ and not the antidote.

He’s not reflecting on the relentless abuse he suffered whilst trying to get his PPE on fast enough or the lives that may have been lost because of those extra seconds taken. Not to mention how it affected his ability to do his job effectively at times.

He cannot comprehend the selfishness of certain individuals who continued to use his service literally, as an Uber, even through a pandemic. 

He refuses to consider the impact of not refuelling his body or even having a sip of water during a 12 hour shift. There was no time to demask easily. He ponders, “Did we make good decisions in this state?”

He won’t dwell upon the risk and the stress he put himself, his wife and his kids through, day after day.

He can’t fathom how his colleague was fired because she wouldn’t get the jab or that she was threatened with six months in jail if she turned up for a shift. He also can’t bear to witness the  desiccating shell of the woman she now is: packing boxes part time in a factory because her paramedic skill set is all she’s ever known.

He doesn’t deliberate over the government’s false claims that everything was ok: that they were coping. They were not coping. He is not coping. He is watching his colleagues leave in droves and all that’s left of this massively understaffed, overworked health sector is a cohort of beyond burnt out human beings. They are NOT superheroes. PTSD, depersonalisation and lack of empathy are creeping in. They’ve all been running on empty way too long.

He’s not thinking about the current, sole topic of conversation amongst his colleagues when they’re ramping. It used to be; the last job, how’s the fam, what you up to this week? Now it’s, “How can we leave? What can we possibly do instead?” 

He is, however, extrapolating into the future, contemplating the aftermath. Graduating paramedics are now entering the field. The quality of their on site training will be so below par it’s terrifying. This is not stacking shelves or waiting on tables. He and his colleagues don’t have the time or the energy to do their own job properly let alone teach others in real-time situations. These graduates will not get the training they deserve. They will not be able to do their job well. And these graduates will become the teachers for the next generation and so on and so forth. 

He is thinking, “If it were me, I would not want to put my life in their hands down the track.”

He is thinking he might also leave.

*Photo Credit: Tim Freer

Original
Framed in 1cm Black Stained Tasmanian Oak
Signed on the front
Signed Certificate of Authenticity.
Total dimensions inc. Frame – 79.2cm x 125.5cm x 5.5cm

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