• Ronelle Reid 006 All In Balance Web
  • All In Balance In Situ
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Additional Information

All in Balance by Ronelle Reid – I have wanted to paint a black-necked stork for a long time and this is the time, oil paint at the ready. They have the most beautiful feathers that are not black at all!

These reference photos were all taken at Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary. Jewel and Mr J are resident black-necked storks (Jabiru) at the sanctuary and I love visiting them when I am there, these storks are thought to pair for life. They are such majestic birds all legs and massive wings. They are currently considered Near Threatened on the IUCN red list.

We also have some cheeky long-necked turtles peeking out of the water surrounded by bulrushes. These long grasses called Typha Orientalis have been used by Aboriginal people for weaving and also tinder for fire starting.

The title of this work talks about the balance in any ecosystem. Yes, these little turtles are a food source for the stork but without them, the stork can’t survive either.

All in Balance

Ronelle Reid

AUD$2,808
Size: 60w x 120h x 5d cms
View in my room

Oil on stretched canvas

Grey timber frame

Ready to hang

In stock

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SKU: SQ3668761
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Additional Information

All in Balance by Ronelle Reid – I have wanted to paint a black-necked stork for a long time and this is the time, oil paint at the ready. They have the most beautiful feathers that are not black at all!

These reference photos were all taken at Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary. Jewel and Mr J are resident black-necked storks (Jabiru) at the sanctuary and I love visiting them when I am there, these storks are thought to pair for life. They are such majestic birds all legs and massive wings. They are currently considered Near Threatened on the IUCN red list.

We also have some cheeky long-necked turtles peeking out of the water surrounded by bulrushes. These long grasses called Typha Orientalis have been used by Aboriginal people for weaving and also tinder for fire starting.

The title of this work talks about the balance in any ecosystem. Yes, these little turtles are a food source for the stork but without them, the stork can’t survive either.

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